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Marchers in coastal cities protest against Morsy

| Monday, Jan. 28, 2013, 11:39 p.m.
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Young demonstrators hang out at the burnt remains of an Egyptian Central Security Forces (CSF) armored vehicle in Tahrir Square early Tuesday morning. The vehicle was torched by protesters during continued clashes with security forces late yesterday evening. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Young boys hang out in the burnt remains of an Egyptian Central Security Forces (CSF) armored vehicle in Tahrir Square early Tuesday morning. The vehicle was torched by protesters during continued clashes with security forces late yesterday evening. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A man stands amongst light posts near the Qasr el Nil Bridge in Cairo early Tuesday morning. The bridge and nearby areas have been the scene of violent clashes between security forces and demonstrators for four consecutive days. Across Egypt the number of killed has risen to 50 with more than 1,000 injured. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Fisherman cast their nets in the waters of the Nile River in Cairo early Tuesday morning, January 29, 2013. While the morning brought quiet to the streets around Tahrir Square, many feared the violent clashes that have raged on the streets of Cairo and across Egypt would continue for a fifth straight day. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Men sweep up the garbage and debris the litters the streets near Tahrir Square in Cairo early on Tuesday morning, January 29, 2013. Areas around the square have been the scene of violent clashes between security forces and demonstrators for four consecutive days. Across Egypt the number of killed has risen to 50 with more than 1,000 injured. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
People gather around the burnt remains of an Egyptian Central Security Forces (CSF) armored vehicle in Tahrir Square early Tuesday morning. The vehicle was torched by protesters during continued clashes with security forces late yesterday evening. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young boy stands in the burnt remains of an Egyptian Central Security Forces (CSF) armored vehicle in Tahrir Square early Tuesday morning. The vehicle was torched by protesters during continued clashes with security forces late yesterday evening. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
People stand on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo during a protest on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator carries a molotov cocktail bomb during a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Violent clashes with protesters and police continued throughout Egypt, raising the number of dead and injured for a forth straight day. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Teargas falls onto protesters in a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator holds up empty teargas canisters during a protest on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator chants during a protest on the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday, the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage.' Two years ago, the government of now-ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak used massive violence against protesters, who had taken the Qasr el-Nil bridge and Tahrir Square as day four of the 18 days of revolution began in earnest. It was on that day that scores of Egyptians were killed and injured in what was one of the most brutal days leading to the end of the Mubarak era. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Demonstrators carry an injured protester from a clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young boy holds empty shells and teargas canisters near a clash with protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A man covers his mouth to avoid the thick cloud of teargas from clashing protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator stands in the middle of a road where protesters clash with security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, protesters clashed with security forces for a forth straight day, leaving the number of injured and killed to rise. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrators stands in the crowd with goggles and a mask as security forces fire teargas onto protesters during a clash near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Monday marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' an historic day in the Egyptian revolution. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A demonstrator carries a burning tire towards the front lines of a clash with protesters and security forces near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Fires are created to help alleviate the effects of the teargas. Clashes continued for a forth straight day across Egypt, leaving a rising number of wounded and dead. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review
A young demonstrators sits near ongoing clash with security forces and protesters near the Qasr el Nil bridge in Cairo on Monday. Across Egypt, violence continued for a fourth straight day leaving the number of dead and injured to rise. Monday marks the second anniversary of the 'Day of Rage,' an historic day in the Egyptian revolution. Justin Merriman | Tribune-Review

CAIRO — Egypt's main opposition bloc rejected a call for dialogue by President Mohamed Morsy as a fourth day of unrest rocked the most populous Arab nation.

Street battles erupted here and elsewhere as protesters recalled 2011's “Day of Rage” that helped to topple the previous regime.

“We came on this bridge two years ago to topple Hosni Mubarak, and we are here today to topple Mohamed Morsy,” said Mustafa Abdel Dey, 25, an unemployed tourism worker. Standing on the Qasr el Nil bridge leading to Tahrir Square, he watched youths and police clash along the Nile River between two upscale hotels.

As white clouds of tear gas swirled, Dey plugged his nostrils with tissues. He once worked on a cruise ship between Luxor and Aswan, he said, “but now there is no work.”

Like many here, he blamed Morsy and the ruling Muslim Brotherhood for the collapse of a once-flourishing tourism industry.

Opposition leaders of the National Salvation Front called for nationwide protests on Friday against Morsy's declaration of states of emergency in violence-torn Port Said, Suez and Ismailia.

In those three coastal cities, marchers chanting against Morsy and the Brotherhood defied a 9 p.m. curfew while soldiers stood watching.

In Cairo, thousands marched on parliament, whose Islamist-dominated upper house authorized the military to arrest civilians.

They were driven back by tear gas, but not before torching a police van.

Ahmed Murad, a science teacher and longtime political activist, denounced Morsy's emergency declaration as “a diabolical plan” to separate the Suez Canal area from the rest of Egypt.

“The Brotherhood would use it as a cover to bring in income for its benefit, to insure their control over Egypt,” Murad, 45, said.

Morsy met with leaders of the country's Islamist parties to discuss solutions to the spiraling unrest that has killed more than 50 and injured more than 1,100.

National Salvation Front leader Mohamed El Baradei refused to meet until Morsy establishes a national unity government, amends a controversial constitution enacted in December, rescinds the legislative power of parliament's upper house – known as the Shura Council – and takes responsibility for the unrest.

“We support any dialogue if it has a clear agenda that can shepherd the nation to the shores of safety,” said Baradei, a former U.N. atomic-weapons inspector. He was flanked by former foreign minister Amr Moussa and former leftist presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabbahi.

In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney condemned the violence and said, “We look for all Egyptians to express themselves peacefully.”

Yet as fighting continued late into the night, many protesters grimly vowed to press on with a revolution that they say was subverted by Egypt's military, then hijacked by the Brotherhood.

Sheikh Shahin, religious leader of Tahrir Square's Omar Makram mosque, told Egyptian reporters that Morsy's emergency declaration is the start of “an era of dictatorship.”

Shahin, widely known as “the protest imam,” said the 2011 revolution is being reversed and compared Morsy's actions to Mubarak-era repression.

Betsy Hiel is the foreign correspondent for Trib Total Media. Email her at bhiel@tribweb.com.

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