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Sheriff: Kansas gunman kills 3, wounds 14, dies in shootout

| Friday, Feb. 26, 2016, 8:27 a.m.
Police look for a possible second shooter in the parking lot of  Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police look for a possible second shooter in the parking lot of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police guard the front door of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police guard the front door of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police go through the parking lot of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police go through the parking lot of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
In this photo provided by KWCH-TV, police vehicles line the road after reports of a shooting at an industrial site in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
In this photo provided by KWCH-TV, police vehicles line the road after reports of a shooting at an industrial site in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
Police stand guard in front of the shattered entrance door of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., where a gunman went on a rampage Thursday Feb. 25, 2016. Harvey County Sheriff T. Walton said 15 people were shot at Excel, three fatally.
Police stand guard in front of the shattered entrance door of Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., where a gunman went on a rampage Thursday Feb. 25, 2016. Harvey County Sheriff T. Walton said 15 people were shot at Excel, three fatally.
EMS workers gather a staging area by Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.
EMS workers gather a staging area by Excel Industries in Hesston, Kan., Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016.

HESSTON, Kan. — A man who stormed into a Kansas factory where he worked and shot 15 people, killing three, had just been served with a protective order that probably triggered the attack, authorities said Friday.

The assault at the Excel Industries lawnmower parts plant in the small town of Hesston ended when a police officer killed the gunman in a shootout.

Harvey County Sheriff T. Walton described the officer as a “tremendous hero” because 200 or 300 people were still in the factory and the “shooter wasn't done by any means.”

“Had that Hesston officer not done what he did, this would be a whole lot more tragic,” Walton said.

The sheriff identified the gunman as Cedric Ford, a 38-year-old plant worker who was armed with an assault rifle and a pistol.

While driving to the factory, the gunman shot a man on the street, striking him in the shoulder. A short time later, he shot someone else in the leg at an intersection, authorities said.

The suspect shot one person in the factory parking lot before opening fire inside the building, the sheriff's department said in a news release.

Ford had several convictions in Florida over the last decade. His past offenses included burglary, grand theft, fleeing from an officer, aggravated fleeing and carrying a concealed weapon, all from Broward and Miami-Dade counties.

According to the Wichita Eagle, Ford also had criminal cases in Harvey County, including a misdemeanor conviction in 2008 for fighting or brawling and various traffic violations from 2014 and 2015.

A Facebook page under the name of a Cedric Ford employed at Excel Industries includes photos posted within the past month of a man posing with a long gun and another of a handgun in a man's lap in a car. Recent posts also include music videos of rappers from Miami, photos of cars and pictures posted in January of a trip to a zoo with children.

The shooting came less than a week after a man opened fire at several locations in the Kalamazoo, Michigan, area, leaving six people dead and two severely wounded. Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive in those attacks.

Eleven of the people wounded in Thursday's attack were taken to two Wichita hospitals, where one was in critical condition, five in serious condition and five in fair condition Friday morning, hospital officials said.

The others were hospitalized in nearby Newton. Their conditions were not immediately available.

Walton said his office served the suspect with the protection-from-abuse order at around 3:30 p.m., about 90 minutes before the first shooting happened. He said such orders are usually filed because there's some type of violence in a relationship. He did not disclose the nature of the relationship in question.

Ford had left work early without explanation before returning hours later with a rifle, according to a co-worker.

Matt Jarrell said he and Ford worked “hand-in-hand” as painters on the second shift. He said Ford arrived as scheduled on Thursday but later disappeared and was not there to relieve him so that he could take a break.

Jarrell said someone else eventually spelled him and that he was sitting in his truck in the parking lot when he saw Ford drive up in a truck that wasn't his. He sped away when he saw Ford shoot someone and then enter the building.

Moments later, Martin Espinoza, who works at Excel, heard people yelling to others to get out of the building, then heard popping and saw the shooter, a co-worker he described as typically pretty calm.

Espinoza said the shooter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger, but the gun was empty. At that point, the gunman got a different gun and Espinoza ran.

“He came outside after a few people, shot outside a few times, shot at the officers coming onto the scene at the moment and then reloaded in front of the company,” Espinoza told The Associated Press. “After he reloaded, he went inside the lobby in front of the building, and that is the last I seen him.”

Dennis Britton Jr. suffered a fracture in his right leg when a bullet went through his buttocks and out his leg.

Britton's father, Dennis Britton Sr., who also works at the plant as a welding team leader, said his son was “awake and talking and communicating.”

The son told his father that people initially mistook the gunshots for the sound of a gas fire. After hearing shouts, the younger Britton stepped out of a welding bay, heard a pop and “immediately went to the ground,” his father said.

The officer who exchanged fire with the shooter was not injured.

Erin McDaniel, a spokeswoman for Newton, said the suspect was known to local authorities. She would not elaborate.

Hesston is a community of about 3,700 about 35 miles north of Wichita.

Excel Industries was founded there in 1960. The company manufactures Hustler and Big Dog mowing equipment.

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