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Gunman in Minnesota business rampage had been fired

| Friday, Sept. 28, 2012, 8:16 p.m.

MINNEAPOLIS — A man fired from his job at a Minneapolis sign-making business pulled out a handgun and began shooting up its offices, fatally wounding the owner and four others before turning the gun on himself, police said Friday.

Andrew Engeldinger, 36, injured at least three others in the Thursday attack at Accent Signage Systems, which Police Chief Tim Dolan said lasted no more than 15 minutes. Dolan said Engeldinger may have chosen to spare some former co-workers.

“It's clear he did walk by some people, very clear,” Dolan said.

Engeldinger's family said in a statement issued through the National Alliance on Mental Illness later Friday that he had struggled with mental illness for years. They offered sympathy to the victims.

“This is not an excuse for his actions, but sadly, may be a partial explanation,” the statement said.

No details were released about why Engeldinger was fired. Investigators who searched his home Thursday night found a second gun and packaging for 10,000 rounds of ammunition in the house. In the shooting, Engeldinger used a 9mm Glock semi-automatic pistol he had owned for about a year, Dolan said.

“He's obviously been practicing in how to use that gun,” Dolan said.

Among those killed was Accent Signage System owner Reuven Rahamim, 61, and Keith Basinski, 50, a UPS driver who had made deliveries and pickups at the business for years.

Relatives described Rahamim, who immigrated from Israel and spent three decades building his business after starting it in his basement, as devoted to his family. Basinski was a Wisconsin native who Dolan said “just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

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