TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Luster off Pennsylvania Avenue

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, 8:06 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Pennsylvania Avenue — sometimes called “America's Main Street” — is being listed among the nation's endangered landscapes because of neglect and deferred maintenance by the National Park Service.

The grand avenue connecting the Capitol and White House is slowly falling into disrepair, the nonprofit Cultural Landscape Foundation said on Wednesday. Water fountains rarely function, benches are broken, and some trees have been removed.

In the early 1960s, President John F. Kennedy called for a revitalization of Pennsylvania Avenue. Improvements included the creation of small parks designed by top landscape architects, including M. Paul Friedberg and Carol Johnson. But they haven't been maintained.

“There really is this kind of very slow downward spiral that is happening,” said Charles Birnbaum, the group's founding president.

Except for part of the road that was redesigned as a pedestrian plaza in 2004 for security in front of the White House, “the lion's share of the 1.2-mile stretch hasn't been renewed,” Birnbaum said.

National Mall Superintendent Robert Vogel said in an emailed statement that the park service is working on ways to preserve and restore Pennsylvania Avenue, though he did not elaborate.

“We welcome the interest and support of the Cultural Landscape Foundation and the attention they can bring to this effort,” he said.

The Washington-based foundation, created in 1998, aims to educate people about historic landscapes through training programs, partnering with local groups and publicity for at-risk spaces. It has a track record of saving threatened landscapes by raising awareness with its annual Landslide listing.

Eleven other sites are being added to the group's Landslide 2012 list, which will be announced on Thursday at an event with New York's Central Park Conservancy. They include Los Angeles' Hannah Carter Japanese Garden; Nasher Sculpture Garden in Dallas; and New York's Jones Beach, a public beach and park designed by Robert Moses in the 1920s that continues to draw 6 million to 8 million visitors each year.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. FBI investigates celebrities’ nude photo claims
  2. High court to weigh pregnancy work rights
  3. Perry distances himself from unflattering image tweeted of DA
  4. New heart failure drug works much better than current treatment, study finds
  5. Surveillance video in Wal-Mart police killing sought
  6. Texas GOP lawmaker calls for end to 40-year crude oil export ban
  7. Ferguson police begin wearing body cameras
  8. President’s Labor Day appearance heavy on politicking
  9. Anti-abortion law in effect in Louisiana, with a caveat
  10. U.S. to get base in Niger to aid Islamist hunt
  11. Mom charged in girl’s death in line for $1M from her trust fund
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.