Share This Page

Copter police hit jackpot: 1,500 marijuana plants

| Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, 9:34 p.m.

CHICAGO — In Chicago, a bustling urban metropolis where skyscrapers are as likely to sprout up as anything a farmer might plant, someone decided there was just enough room to grow something a little more organic: marijuana.

The plants grew even taller than the tallest Chicago Bulls. But just days before the crop on a chunk of land the size of two football fields would have been ready to harvest, a police officer and a Cook County sheriff's deputy in a helicopter spotted the marijuana as they headed back to their hangar about three miles away.

On Wednesday, a day after the discovery of the largest marijuana farm anyone at the police department can remember, officers became farmers for a day as they began to chop down about 1,500 marijuana plants that police said could have earned the growers as much as $10 million.

No arrests had been made as of Wednesday, and police still are trying to determine who owns the property that housed the grow site on the city's far South Side. Police, though, said they are hopeful that because of the size of the operation, informants or others might provide tips about those involved, including a man seen running from the area as the helicopter swooped low.

James O'Grady, commander of the department's narcotics division, said police never have witnessed anything like it before — in part because Chicago's harsh winters give growers less time to plant, grow and harvest marijuana than their counterparts in less inclement places, such as California and Mexico. The bumper crop likely was planted in spring, O'Grady said.

Add to that the urban sprawl — there are few spots in Chicago where such an operation could go unnoticed because of all the buildings, roads and residents. The growers took pains to ensure their crop was largely hidden by a canopy of trees and surrounding vegetation.

“Somebody put a lot of thought into it,” O'Grady said. “But they probably didn't anticipate the helicopter.” Chicago police Officer Stan Kuprianczyk, a pilot, said police helicopters flew “over it all the time,” to and from their hangar, without spying the grow site. Yet somehow, a number of factors came together to allow Cook County Sheriff's Deputy Edward Graney to spot the plants.

“We had the right altitude, the right angle, the right sunlight, and I happened to be glancing down,” Graney said.

He said he initially spotted five plants or so through the trees before he asked Kuprianczyk to circle around for a closer look.

“We just happened to be right over a small hole in the trees and we looked down,” Kuprianczyk said.

They also happened to have the right training, Graney said. Just a few weeks earlier, a much smaller operation in suburban Chicago prompted police to fly over and videotape the scene so they might be able to recognize marijuana if they ever saw it from the air again.

By the time Graney spotted the marijuana plants —much brighter shades of green than the surrounding vegetation — he had a pretty good idea what he was seeing.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.