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Border Patrol agent's shooting death may have been friendly fire, says union chief

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By The Associated Press
Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, 6:40 p.m.
 

PHOENIX — The shooting of two U.S. Border Patrol agents near the Arizona-Mexico border might have been a case of friendly fire, a union chief for border agents and law enforcement officials said Friday.

The development could shake up the investigation into the death of one of the agents that re-ignited the political debate over border security.

George McCubbin, president of the National Border Patrol Council — a union representing about 17,000 border agents — said Friday that he has learned new details that make him believe friendly fire could have been involved in the shooting.

“The only thing I can say is that the possibility of friendly fire is a higher likely scenario,” McCubbin said, declining to elaborate on the new details.

Two law enforcement officials told The Associated Press that the FBI is investigating the possibility that the fatal shooting of 30-year-old Agent Nicholas Ivie and the wounding of another agent early Tuesday morning is a case of friendly fire. The incident took place five miles from the border.

The probe is examining whether the two agents exchanged gunfire in the mistaken belief that each was being fired on by a hostile gunman.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the matter is under investigation.

FBI officials in Washington and Phoenix declined to comment.

The shooting occurred in a rugged hilly area about five miles north of the border near Bisbee, Ariz. The agents responded to an alarm that was triggered on one of the sensors that the government installed along the border. The wounded agent has been released from the hospital; the third agent was uninjured.

Ivie's death marks the first fatal shooting of an agent since a deadly 2010 firefight with Mexican bandits that killed U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in December 2010. The incident spawned congressional probes of the botched “Fast and Furious,” allowed people suspected of illegally buying guns for others to walk away from gun shops with weapons, rather than be arrested.

 

 
 


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