TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Saudi student gets life in plot to strike in U.S.,

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

Daily Photo Galleries


By The Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012, 8:04 p.m.

AMARILLO, Texas — A former Texas college student from Saudi Arabia was sentenced to life in prison on Tuesday for trying to make a bomb for use in a religious attack, possibly targeting a former U.S. president.

Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari was sentenced in Amarillo, where jurors convicted him in June of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction. Prosecutors say he had collected bomb-making material in his apartment and researched possible targets, including the Dallas home of former President George W. Bush. A handwritten journal found in his apartment included notes that he believed it was time for “jihad,” a Muslim term for holy war.

Although the 22-year-old Aldawsari apologized Tuesday for “these bad actions,” Judge Donald E. Walter said the evidence against him was overwhelming. Walter acknowledged he was conflicted due to Aldawsari's youth and signs that outside influences had led him astray.

“But the bottom line is that but by the grace of God there would be dead Americans,” Walter said. “You would have done it. In every step, it was you all alone.”

There is no parole in the federal system for defendants convicted of recent crimes.

Aldawsari came to the U.S. legally in 2008 to study chemical engineering. He was arrested in Lubbock in February 2011, after federal agents searched his apartment and found explosive chemicals, wiring, a hazmat suit and clocks, along with videos showing how to make the chemical explosive TNP.

Investigators say Aldawsari's goal was to carry out jihad. His attorneys claimed he was a harmless failure who never came close to attacking anyone.

FBI bomb experts say the amounts of chemicals he had would have yielded almost 15 pounds of explosive — about the same amount used per bomb in the 2005 London subway attacks. He also tried to order phenol, a chemical that can be used to make explosives.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Teen OK after riding in wheel well of Hawaii jet
  2. Shale oil, gas drilling boom wins favor with labor unions, thwarting environmentalists
  3. After bombs, Boston Marathon under tight security
  4. IRS, other agencies award contracts to license plate tracking company
  5. Postal Service overhaul expected to appeal to Dems
  6. Study of corn waste as fuel source finds gasoline less damaging to atmosphere
  7. Warnings on youths, codeine unheeded; lack of effectiveness, dangers had been raised
  8. Navy endorses 24-hour sleep cycle for sailors
  9. Art from ‘Dick and Jane’ series set for auction
  10. Ruling on Cleveland police chase questioned
  11. Seafood study: Up to 32 percent imported to U.S. is caught illegally
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.