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GOP keeps its leadership; Pelosi wants to remain top Dem in House

| Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, 7:44 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers in both parties on Wednesday re-elected most of their leaders in Congress, while Nancy Pelosi ended some suspense by announcing she would seek to remain the top Democrat in the House of Representatives in a vote on Nov. 29.

In the Senate, Republicans re-elected Mitch McConnell as their leader, notwithstanding his failure to achieve his two top goals in the elections, defeating President Obama and gaining a Republican majority in the Senate.

Sen. John Cornyn, who headed the Senate Republican Campaign Committee, ended up with a promotion, getting elected without opposition to replace retiring Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl as minority whip.

House Speaker John Boehner was re-elected as expected, which means the full House will re-elect him as speaker in January.

Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the Republican conference vice chair, defeated Tom Price to be head of the House Republican Conference.

McMorris Rodgers is the highest ranking woman in the GOP leadership.

The 112th Congress, now in a post-election lame duck session, will become the 113th Congress in January before Obama is inaugurated for his second term. The leaders chosen now, barring resignations or other unexpected developments, will serve through January 2015.

Senate Democrats re-elected their top two leaders — majority leader Harry Reid and whip Dick Durbin.

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