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Bootleggers in city hall — legally

AP - Distiller Bob Suchke checks the clarity of a batch of genuine corn whisky on Friday, Nov. 16, before it's tempered in the Dawsonville Moonshine Distillery, in Dawsonville, Ga. AP
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Distiller Bob Suchke checks the clarity of a batch of genuine corn whisky on Friday, Nov. 16, before it's tempered in the Dawsonville Moonshine Distillery, in Dawsonville, Ga.  AP
AP - Dwight Bearden (right) and Bob Suchke look over a batch of fermented apple brandy mash as they make moonshine on Friday, Nov. 16, in the Dawsonville Moonshine Distillery in Dawsonville, Ga. AP
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>AP</em></div>Dwight Bearden (right) and Bob Suchke look over a batch of fermented apple brandy mash as they make moonshine on Friday, Nov. 16, in the Dawsonville Moonshine Distillery in Dawsonville, Ga.  AP

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:16 p.m.
 

DAWSONVILLE, Ga. — Moonshine distillers are making their first batches of legal liquor in this tiny Georgia town's city hall, not far from the mountains and the maroon, orange and gold canopy of trees that once hid bootleggers from the law.

A handful of moonshine distilleries are scattered across the South, but observers say this is the first they've ever seen right in a city hall. The distilleries come amid an increased interest in the United States for locally made specialty spirits and beer brewed in homes and microbreweries.

The Dawsonville moonshine makers and city officials say the operation helps preserve a way of life. It carries on traditions of an era when moonshine meant extra income for farmers and medicine for their children and helped fuel the start of NASCAR racing.

“Dawson County was, sure enough, the moonshine capital of the world at one time,” distiller Dwight Bearden said as he checked on the still where the third batch of Dawsonville Moonshine was being prepared. “It was just a way of life back then.”

The clanking of the still and the smell of corn and alcohol fill the room several yards and a few interior walls away from the offices of the city clerk, the mayor and other officials running the town about 60 miles north of Atlanta. The city leases the space to the distillery.

Outside city hall are old, abandoned cars from the days when Ford coupes and other models from the 1930s and '40s hauled moonshine down Georgia Highway 9. The windy mountain highway became known as Thunder Road because it was filled with the screaming sounds of car engines as bootleggers hauled their moonshine to Atlanta.

The young drivers were sometimes pursued by “revenue men” from the federal government, and the chases sometimes led to overturned cars and deadly wrecks.

Townspeople are proud of how young Dawsonville men raced their cars at places like Lakewood Speedway in Atlanta after moonshine deliveries, which helped stock-car racing gain a following in its early days.

Inside the distillery are plenty of reminders of the days when moonshine was made in the surrounding foothills.

Entrepreneur Cheryl “Happy” Wood points with pride to a portrait of her grandfather, Simmie Free, hanging on one wall.

“Mama said, ‘When you get this going, I want you to hang this up,'” Wood said.

Free learned how to make moonshine from his father, who learned it from his father, she said.

“We grew up around it, and it was our medicine,” Wood said. Cough medicine was among its medicinal uses, she said.

Wood has been planning the distillery for about five years. As she searched for a site, she and city officials began to realize that city hall would be an ideal spot, Dawsonville Mayor W. James Grogan said.

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