| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Lowered Mississippi River reveals hazards to barge traffic

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By McClatchy Newspapers
Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, 7:28 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers from drought-stricken states along the Mississippi River on Thursday asked the Army Corps of Engineers and President Obama to act quickly to remove navigation hazards from the river that threaten to slow or stop barge traffic.

Low water levels have made it difficult for the corps to maintain a 9-foot-deep and 300-foot-wide navigation channel for barges on the river, an economic lifeline that carries billions of dollars of agricultural products, coal, chemicals and petroleum.

The low water also gives the corps an opportunity to remove a cluster of troublesome rock formations in several miles of the river just south of Cape Girardeau, Mo. Removing them will require shutting down the shipping channel for 12 hours at a time, creating a temporary headache for shippers.

“Long-term this would be in the best interest of navigation,” said Bob Anderson, a spokesman for the corps in Vicksburg, Miss. “Short-term it might be a little bit difficult.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. New Navy destroyer Zumwalt’s seaworthiness questioned before sea trials
  2. Storm lingers in southern Plains
  3. Upstate New York town threatened by Arizona man in online post, reports say
  4. Hunt on for mother of baby buried alive in California
  5. Federal $1.1 trillion spending bill loaded with policy deals
  6. Colorado clinic shooting suspect talked of baby parts, police say
  7. Democrats face long odds in battle for lost congressional seats
  8. Suspect in Colorado attack called loner who left few clues
  9. Nation’s $1 billion defense against biological terrorism faulty, GAO watchdog warns
  10. Hawaii confronts dengue fever cases
  11. Slow-moving, wintry storm packs punch in Plains, Midwest