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Priest sex-abuse files, minus church officials' names, ready for release in LA

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By The Los Angeles Times

Published: Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, 6:48 p.m.

LOS ANGELES — In its landmark $660 million settlement with victims of sexual abuse five years ago, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles agreed to make public the confidential personnel records of all priests accused of molesting children.

Victims said the release of the files would provide accountability for church leaders who let pedophiles remain in ministry, and law enforcement officials suggested that the documents could lead to criminal cases against those in charge.

After years of delays and legal wrangling, the files are set to become public in coming weeks.

But the documents have been scrubbed of what many regard as the most important information: the identities of the members of the church hierarchy who reshuffled abusers.

The names of the former cardinal, Roger M. Mahony, and the bishops and vicars who handled molestation complaints for him have been redacted by church lawyers at the direction of a retired federal judge managing the files' release.

In handing down that decision last year, the judge, Dickran Tevrizian, said the archdiocese had endured enough criticism and that he wanted to prevent the files from being used to “embarrass or to ridicule the church.” The documents in question include internal memos, Vatican correspondence and psychiatric reports.

“You know that the church recycles priests. Now you want to know who in the clergy recycled. For what useful purpose? The case is settled,” Tevrizian told lawyers for 562 people who settled sex-abuse claims against the archdiocese.

The terms of the agreement prohibit the archdiocese and the victims from appealing the redactions, but Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Emilie H. Elias, who is overseeing the settlement, has the final say. She has ruled that “any other interested person or entity” can ask her to review Tevrizian's decisions on the files' release.

Some abuse victims are hoping the judge decides to release the full, unredacted files, saying that would be in keeping with the settlement. Manuel Vega, a retired police officer who settled with the archdiocese over his abuse as an altar boy in Oxnard, said the officials' names were essential in documenting the history of how the church handled allegations of child molestation.

“One of the first things I'm going to be looking for is, ‘Who knew?' And who knew is what's going to be redacted,” he said.

On Friday, the Los Angeles Times filed a motion urging Elias to overrule the redactions of church officials' names.

“Without this information, the public will never know what the church knew, and when, because the names that might demonstrate that particular church officials knew about more than one instance of misconduct — whether by a single priest or by multiple priests —will be forever hidden,” lawyers for the newspaper wrote.

The accused clergy have filed their own objections to Tevrizian's order, contending that the files should remain sealed to protect the priests' privacy and other rights.

Lawyers for the archdiocese recently completed redacting the documents, a process that took more than a year, and are awaiting Elias' final ruling.

 

 
 


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