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Secretary of State Clinton hospitalized with blood clot

| Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012, 9:20 p.m.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was hospitalized in New York on Sunday because doctors monitoring her recovery from a concussion discovered a blood clot, according to a statement from her office.

The statement said that “in the course of a follow-up exam, Secretary Clinton's doctors discovered a blood clot had formed, stemming from the concussion she sustained several weeks ago. She is being treated with anti-coagulants and is at New York-Presbyterian hospital so that they can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours.

“Her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including other issues associated with her concussion. They will determine if any further action is required.”

Clinton aide Philippe Reines, who issued the statement, declined to provide further details.

Reines said on Thursday that Clinton's recuperation was continuing and that she was expected to resume her office schedule this week.

The State Department first disclosed Clinton's concussion on Dec. 15, saying that she had fallen in her home. The fall resulted from dehydration caused by a stomach virus, the department said. Aides and doctors said that Clinton's concussion was diagnosed on Dec. 13. She has not been seen in public since.

Clinton canceled an overseas trip and scheduled testimony before Congress on the Sept. 11 attacks on a U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. She did not appear at the White House on Dec. 21, when President Obama introduced Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., as his nominee to succeed Clinton, 65.

Republicans have said they are likely to hold up Kerry's nomination hearing until Clinton testifies about the Benghazi attack.

Clinton said last summer that she would not serve a second term if Obama was re-elected.

Before the announcement about Clinton's hospitalization, Obama on NBC's “Meet the Press” reaffirmed a decision by Clinton to carry out all 29 recommendations made by a State Department review panel that examined the circumstances surrounding the attacks in Benghazi.

“It confirms what we had already seen based on some of our internal reviews; there was just some sloppiness, not intentional, in terms of how we secure embassies in areas where you essentially don't have governments that have a lot of capacity to protect those embassies,” he said.

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