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Newtown worries over return to class

| Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, 7:06 p.m.

NEWTOWN, Conn. — Since escaping a gunman's rampage at their elementary school, the 8-year-old Connors triplets have suffered nightmares, jumped at noises and clung to their parents a little more than usual.

Now parents like David Connors are bracing to send their children back to school, nearly three weeks after the shooting rampage at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. It won't be easy — for the parents or the children, who heard the gunshots that killed 20 of their classmates and six educators.

“I'm nervous about it,” Connors said. “It's uncharted waters for us. I know it's going to be difficult.”

Classes will start on Thursday at a repurposed school in the neighboring town of Monroe, where the students' desks have been taken along with backpacks and other belongings that were left behind in the chaos after the shooting on Dec. 14. Families have been coming in to see the new school, and an open house is scheduled for Wednesday.

An army of workers has been getting the school ready — painting, moving furniture and even raising the floors in the bathrooms of the former middle school so the smaller elementary school students can reach the toilets.

Meanwhile, a Connecticut attorney seeking to sue the state for $100 million on behalf of a 6-year-old survivor of the massacre has withdrawn the claim — at least for now.

The Stamford Advocate reports that Irving Pinsky withdrew the lawsuit but says he might refile. He said he received new evidence on security at Sandy Hook and is reviewing it.

Pinsky last week asked to sue the state, saying his client suffered “emotional and psychological trauma and injury” during the shooting rampage. He said state officials failed to prevent his client from foreseeable harm.

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