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Clinton discharged from N.Y. hospital, 'eager to return to work' following treatment for blood clot in head

| Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013, 7:52 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was released from a New York hospital on Wednesday, three days after doctors discovered a blood clot in her head.

Clinton's medical team advised her that she is making good progress on all fronts. Her doctors said they are confident she will recover fully, said Clinton spokesman Philippe Reines.

Doctors had been treating Clinton with blood thinners to dissolve a clot in a vein that runs through the space between the brain and the skull behind the right ear. They said there is no neurological damage.

“She's eager to get back to the office,” Reines said in a statement, adding that the secretary and her family are grateful for the excellent care she received at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Reines said details of when Clinton will return to work will be clarified in the coming days.

Clinton, 65, had been in the hospital since Sunday, when doctors discovered the clot on an MRI test during a follow-up exam stemming from a concussion she suffered earlier in December. While at home battling a stomach virus, Clinton had fainted, fallen and struck her head, a spokesman said.

“Grateful my Mom discharged from the hospital and is heading home,” the secretary's daughter, Chelsea, wrote on Twitter. “Even more grateful her medical team (is) confident she'll make a full recovery.”

The State Department said Clinton had been speaking by telephone with staff in Washington and reviewing paperwork while in the hospital.

“She's been quite active on the phone with all of us,” said State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.

Before being released from the hospital, Clinton was photographed getting into a black van with husband Bill, Chelsea and a security contingent to be taken elsewhere on the sprawling hospital campus. The last time Hillary Clinton had been seen in public was on Dec. 7.

Midway through her husband's second term as president in 1998, Clinton had a blood clot in a knee.

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