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1 in 24 adults sleep, drive; CDC fears number higher

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, 8:16 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — This could give you nightmares: One in 24 adults say they recently fell asleep while driving.

Health officials behind the study believe the number is probably higher, saying that some people don't realize when they nod off for a second or two behind the wheel.

“If I'm on the road, I'd be a little worried about the other drivers,” said the study's lead author, Anne Wheaton of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the CDC study released on Thursday, about 4 percent of adults said they nodded off or fell asleep at least once while driving in the previous month. Some earlier studies reached a similar conclusion, but the CDC telephone survey of 147,000 adults was larger.

The study was conducted in 19 states and the District of Columbia from 2009-10.

CDC researchers found that drowsy driving was more common in men; people ages 25 to 34; those who averaged less than six hours of sleep each night; and — for some unexplained reason — Texans.

Wheaton said the Texas survey sample could have included larger numbers of sleep-deprived young adults or apnea-suffering, overweight people.

Most of the CDC findings are not surprising to those who study the problem.

“A lot of people are getting insufficient sleep,” said Dr. Gregory Belenky, director of Washington State University's Sleep and Performance Research Center in Spokane.

The government estimates that about 3 percent of fatal traffic crashes involve drowsy drivers, but other estimates have put that number as high as 33 percent.

Warning signs of drowsy driving: feeling very tired, not remembering the last mile or two, or drifting onto rumble strips on the side of the road.

The symptoms should signal a driver to get off the road and rest, Wheaton said.

Even a brief moment of nodding off can be extremely dangerous, she said. At 60 mph, a single second translates to speeding along for 88 feet — the length of two school buses.

To prevent drowsy driving, health officials recommend getting seven to nine hours of sleep each night, treating any sleep disorders and not drinking alcohol before driving.

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