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Another Gold-Rush era artifact pilfered from California museum

| Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, 7:18 p.m.

OAKLAND, Calif. — The Oakland Museum of California offered a $12,000 reward Wednesday for the safe recovery of a stolen gold-encrusted jewel box — the latest in a series of thefts involving Gold Rush-era artifacts in the region.

The box stolen Monday depicts images of early California history and was originally a wedding anniversary gift from a San Francisco pioneer to his wife in the 1800s, museum director Lori Fogarty said.

It's the size of a small shoebox and weighs about three pounds.

Oakland city officials have said the box was valued at more than $800,000, but Fogarty said it was difficult to put a price on it.

“It's very difficult to assign value to something like this,” she said. “But I can say it's a treasure of our collection and a critical piece in our holdings.”

It was the second major theft in as many months from the popular Gold Rush exhibit at the Oakland museum. Gold nuggets and other historic artifacts were taken in November. Police believe the same culprit may have committed both thefts.

Fogarty said the high price of gold — which was selling Wednesday at about $1,657 an ounce — might have prompted the break-ins.

In September, a state mining and mineral museum in the Sierra foothills in Mariposa was robbed of an estimated $1.3 million in gold, precious gems and artifacts by thieves armed with pickaxes.

In February, thieves smashed a lobby display case at the Siskiyou County courthouse and made off with large chunks of gold. Both sites are in California's Gold Country, where people from around the world came in the mid-1800s to strike it rich.

Four people have been arrested and charged in the Mariposa case.

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan made a plea for the safe return of the jewel box that belongs to the city.

“This is not something you can sell on a street corner,” Quan said. “We hope those who will be approached will return it to the people of Oakland. This is a theft not only of a valuable object, but a theft of our history.”

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