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Steubenville school board urges witnesses to aid alleged rape investigation

| Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, 8:46 p.m.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Students withholding information about an alleged rape in eastern Ohio last summer are thwarting investigators, school officials said Thursday, as the FBI looks into threats to local authorities who are working on the case against two high school football players.

The Steubenville school board is expanding programs to raise further awareness of sexual harassment, bullying, date rape and substance abuse as a result of the incident in August in which the two high school football players are accused of raping a 16-year-old girl.

The district said in a statement it is lining up training programs for faculty, staff, parents and students, with “targeted sessions” for student-athletes. The statement said officials were troubled to learn police were having difficulty getting cooperation from witnesses.

“By remaining silent, witnesses thwart the work of investigators which may ultimately prevent justice from being served,” the statement said.

Recent events persuaded the board to release the statement, Superintendent Mike McVey said. That includes the release earlier this month of a 12-minute video in which a student jokes about the accuser, with other people heard in the background chiming in.

An attorney for the student seen in the video has said the student regrets the comments.

Online messages have targeted individuals and authorities in Steubenville amid increased attention to the rape charges against the football players. City authorities have launched a website to combat misperceptions about the case, including the allegation that the football team has an unusual sway over the city of about 18,000.

Steubenville police Chief William McCafferty said he was checking work email at his office Wednesday when he opened a message and his computer was disabled.

McCafferty said the email was one in a series he's received from someone claiming to be a hacker angry at others who have been critical of law enforcement's handling of the case. McCafferty said the emailer had been sending directions in attachments for how to get back at the group.

McCafferty said he never opened any attachments but his computer was disabled anyway. The FBI has a copy of the email, McCafferty said.

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