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Labor's membership numbers fall to 1930s level

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Regional decline

• In Pennsylvania, union workers accounted for 14.6 percent of the workforce in 2011. That number dropped to 13.5 percent in 2012.

• In Ohio, union representation fell from 13.4 percent in 2011 to 12.6 percent in 2012.

• In West Virginia, 13.8 percent of workers were union members in 2011, compared with 12.1 percent in 2012.

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By The Associated Press

Published: Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 7:32 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Union membership plummeted last year to the lowest level since the 1930s as cash-strapped state and local governments shed workers and unions had difficulty in organizing new members in the private sector despite signs of an improving economy.

Government figures released on Wednesday showed union membership declined from 11.8 percent to 11.3 percent of the workforce, another blow to a labor movement stretched thin by battles in Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan and other states to curb bargaining rights and weaken union clout.

Overall membership fell by about 400,000 workers to 14.4 million, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. More than half of the loss, about 234,000, came from government workers, including teachers, firefighters and public administrators.

Unions also had losses in the private sector, even as the economy created 1.8 million jobs in 2012. That membership rate fell from 6.9 percent to 6.6 percent, a troubling sign for the future of organized labor, as job growth generally has taken place at nonunion companies.

“To employers, it's going to look like the labor movement is ready for a knockout punch,” said Gary Chaison, professor of industrial relations at Clark University in Worcester, Mass. “You can't be a movement and get smaller.”

Union membership was 13.2 percent in 1935 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the National Labor Relations Act. Labor's ranks peaked in the 1950s, when about 1 of every 3 workers was in a union. By 1983, roughly 20 percent of workers were union members.

Losses in the public sector are hitting unions particularly hard because that has been one of the few areas where membership had grown over the past two decades. About 51 percent of union members work in government, where the rate of union membership is 37 percent, more than five times higher than in the private sector.

Until recently, there had been little resistance to unions organizing government workers. That began to change when Republican Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin signed a law in 2011 eliminating most union rights for government workers. The state lost about 46,000 union members last year, with the vast majority in the public sector.

The recession that began in 2008 also led to much deeper cuts in state and local governments than any previous recession, according to a report this month from the Nelson Rockefeller Institute of Government at the State University of New York at Albany. Since August 2008, state government employment has declined by 135,000, while local government employment fell by 546,000.

Despite the steady membership decline, unions remain a potent political force because of the money they spend in helping union-friendly candidates seeking public office. Unions spent more than $400 million during the 2012 election cycle.

 

 
 


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