Share This Page

Gun control advocates march in Washington

| Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, 7:58 p.m.
AFP/Getty Images
Movita Johnson-Harrell (left) is among a group of marchers holding placards devoted to specific victims of gun violence as gun control proponents march on Saturday, Jan. 26 in Washington. AFP | Getty Images

WASHINGTON — Thousands of people, including about 100 residents of Newtown, Conn., joined a rally for gun control on Saturday, marching from the Capitol to the Washington Monument.

Leading the crowd were marchers with “We Are Sandy Hook” signs, paying tribute to victims of the December school shooting in Newtown, Conn.

Participants held signs reading “Gun Control Now,” “Stop NRA” and “What Would Jesus Pack?” among other messages.

Kara Baekey, who's from Norwalk, Conn., said that when she heard about the shooting in which 20 students were killed, she immediately thought of her two young children. She said she decided she must take action, and that's why she traveled to Washington for the march.

“I wanted to make sure this never happens at my kids' school or any other school,” Baekey said. Once the crowd arrived at the monument, speakers called for a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition and for universal background checks on gun sales.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan told the crowd it's not about taking away Second Amendment gun rights, but about gun safety and saving lives. He said he and President Obama would do everything they could to enact gun control policies.

“This is about trying to create a climate in which our children can grow up free of fear,” Duncan said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.