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Bachmann leading target of Dem super PAC

| Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, 8:36 p.m.

The leading super PAC that helps elect House Democrats says it will target Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann and nine other Republicans for defeat in the 2014 elections.

The House Majority PAC, which spent about $36 million on campaigns last year, said each GOP target is in a competitive district and “has an out-of-touch, extreme record.”

“In 2012, House Majority PAC built a strong record of success and in 2013 we are ready to hit the ground running to hold these Republicans accountable and communicate with swing voters about their extreme records and backwards priorities,” said Alixandria Lapp, the PAC's executive director.

Bachmann, the founder of the House Tea Party Caucus who ran for president last year, stands out because she narrowly won re-election in Minnesota. She defeated Democrat Jim Graves by a little more than 1 percentage point in the House's most-expensive race last year. Bachmann spent more than $22 million vs. about $2.2 million spent by Graves, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Besides Bachmann, the House Majority PAC is aiming at Republicans Mike Coffman of Colrado, Gary Miller of California, Rodney Davis of Illinois, Mike Fitzpatrick of Bucks County, Michael Grimm of New York, Joe Heck of Nevada, David Joyce of Ohio, John Kline of Minnesota and Steve Southerland of Florida. Democrats need a net gain of 17 seats to win the House majority next year. Midterm elections, however, are typically challenging for a president's party. In 2010, President Obama said his Democrats took a “shellacking” when Republicans won 63 House seats.

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