| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Official: Abducted boy cries for his parents

Law enforcement officials continue to work the scene of the hostage crisis in Midland City, Ala., Friday, Feb. 1, 2013. Local, state and federal officers wait out a man accused of shooting and killing a school bus driver, then snatching a 5-year-old child. Suspect Jimmy Lee Dykes has been holed up in a bunker on his property with the child since the late afternoon shooting on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013. AP

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, 9:37 p.m.

MIDLAND CITY, Ala. — After four anxious days, only the slimmest of details has come to light in a police standoff with an Alabama man who is accused of holding a 5-year-old boy hostage in a bunker, a sign of just how delicate the negotiations are. But one local official admitted that the child had been heard crying for his parents.

Police have used a ventilation pipe in the underground bunker to talk to the man and deliver the boy medication for his emotional disorders, but they have not revealed how often they are in touch or what the conversations have been about. And authorities waited until Friday — four days after the siege began — to confirm what so many in this age of instant communication already knew: The man accused of killing a school bus driver and abducting the boy Tuesday was 65-year-old Jimmy Lee Dykes, a Vietnam-era veteran who was known to neighbors as a menacing figure.

While much of what is going on inside the bunker remains a mystery, local officials who have spoken to police or the boy's family have described a small room with food, electricity and a TV.

Meanwhile, Midland City residents held out hope that the standoff would end safely and mourned for the slain bus driver and his family. Candlelight vigils have been held nightly at a gazebo in front of City Hall. Residents prayed, sang songs such as “Amazing Grace” and nailed homemade wooden crosses on the gazebo's railings alongside signs that read: “We are praying for you.”

“We're doing any little thing that helps show support for him,” said 15-year-old Taylor Edwards said.

Former hostage negotiators said authorities must be cautious and patient as long as they are confident that the boy is unharmed. Ex-FBI hostage negotiator Clint Van Zandt advised against any drastic measures, such as cutting the electricity to, or putting sleep gas inside, the bunker because it could agitate Dykes.

The negotiator should try to ease Dykes' anxieties over what will happen when the standoff ends, and refer to both the boy and Dykes by their first names, he said.

“I want to give him a reason to come out,” Van Zandt said, “and my reason is, ‘You didn't mean that to happen. It was unintentional. It could have happened to anyone. It was an accident. People have accidents, Jimmy Lee. It's not that big a thing. You and I can work that out.'” Police seemed to be following that pattern. At a brief news conference to release a photo of Dykes, they brushed off any questions about possible charges.

“It's way too early for that,” said Kevin Cook, a spokesman for the Alabama state troopers.

The shelter is about 4 feet underground, with about 6-by-8 feet of floor space and there is a PVC pipe that negotiators were speaking through.

One of Dykes' next-door neighbors said he spent two or three months constructing the bunker, digging several feet into the ground and then building a structure of lumber and plywood, which he covered with sand and dirt.

Neighbor Michael Creel said Dykes put the plastic pipe underground from the bunker to the end of his driveway so he can hear if anyone drives up to his gate.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Stylish, inexpensive dress takes television newsrooms by storm
  2. Web-savvy terrorists have success luring U.S. recruits with social media
  3. Congress agrees to transportation bill
  4. House votes to thwart power plant regulations
  5. Death of Juneau mayor remains unsolved
  6. Question of terror raised in Planned Parenthood attack in Colo.
  7. Cleveland officer says he, partner repeatedly yelled ‘show me your hands’ to 12-year-old who was shot
  8. IRS pledges its investigators will stop tracking cellphones without warrants
  9. Special ops force to head to Iraq to carry out raids on ISIS
  10. Supreme Court step closer on key immigration case
  11. Retired general, Obama adviser says re-election bid skewed response to early intel on growth of ISIS