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Boy, 5, still held hostage in Ala. standoff

AP
Members of an FBI team maintain a cordon on Saturday, Feb. 2, in Midland City, Ala. AP

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, 7:12 p.m.
 

MIDLAND CITY, Ala. — As the standoff with a man accused of holding a 5-year-old boy hostage continued Saturday, a nearby community prepared to bury the beloved school bus driver who was shot to death when the episode started to unfold five days ago.

Charles Albert Poland Jr., 66, known as Chuck, was described by folks in his hometown of Newton as a humble hero who gave his life on Tuesday to protect the children on his bus. Visitations for Poland were scheduled for Saturday evening, and his funeral service was set for Sunday afternoon.

“I believe that if he had to do it all over again tomorrow, he would,” said Poland's sister-in-law, Lavern Skipper. “He would do it for those children.”

Authorities said Jim Lee Dykes, a Vietnam War-era veteran known as Jimmy to his neighbors, boarded a stopped school bus filled with 21 children Tuesday afternoon and demanded two boys between 6 and 8 years old.

When Poland tried to block his way, the gunman shot him several times and took one 5-year-old boy, who police say remains in an underground bunker with Dykes.

Dale County Sheriff Wally Olson said in a briefing with reporters on Saturday that Dykes has told them that he has blankets and an electric heater in the bunker. Authorities have been communicating with him through a ventilation pipe to the bunker.

Olson also said Dykes has allowed authorities to deliver coloring books, medication and toys for the boy.

“I want to thank him for taking care of our boy,” Olson said. “That's very important.”

Newton, a small hamlet with fewer than 2,000 residents, is about 3 miles away from Midland City, where the shooting and abduction took place.

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