TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Anti-abuse bill clearing hurdles in Senate

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, 8:48 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats, bolstered by Republican support, on Monday began a new attempt to broaden a law protecting women from domestic abuse by expanding its provisions to cover gays, lesbians and Native Americans.

The legislation to renew the Violence Against Women Act appeared on a smooth path toward passage in the Senate, possibly by the end of this week. The vote to make the bill the next order of business was 85-8.

Senate passage would send the bill to the House. Advocates hope that Republicans, smarting from election losses among women voters in November, won't repeat their resistance last year to the Senate approach.

“Allowing partisan delays to put women's lives at risk is simply shameful,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said before the vote. He said he hoped convincing support for the legislation in the Senate would “send a strong message to House Republican leaders that further partisan delay is unacceptable.”

House Republicans, including Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia, say reauthorizing the 1994 act, which expired in 2011, is a priority. But resolving partisan differences remains an obstacle: Last year, the House and Senate passed bills, but the House would not go along with Senate provisions that single out gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgenders for protection and give tribal authorities more power to prosecute non-Indians who attack Indian partners on tribal lands.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Pollard, spy for Israel, to be set free
  2. GOP says there’s no deal with Clinton on Benghazi testimony
  3. Congress embraces highway bill
  4. Cruz chided over remarks in prelude to Ex-Im Bank vote
  5. Republicans seek firing of IRS chief in feud over missing emails
  6. Boy Scouts of America votes to end controversial ban on openly gay leaders
  7. Nuke arms program gets 4-star leadership
  8. House, Senate clash over highway funds before Friday deadline
  9. Feds probe timing of ticket cost at airlines days after Amtrak crash in Philadelphia
  10. Fiat Chrysler to buy back more than 500K Ram pickups
  11. Police try to see if man killed by escort was linked to crimes against women