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D.C. intern Chandra Levy's killer back in court in secret case

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By McClatchy Newspapers

Published: Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, 8:50 p.m.

WASHINGTON — The man convicted of killing former intern Chandra Levy returned to court on Thursday for the first time in two years, and questions concerning the credibility of a prosecution witness will remain secret for now.

Over the objections of defense attorneys and attorneys for several news organizations, District of Columbia Superior Court Judge Gerald I. Fisher ruled that the next court proceedings will be sealed again.

“Ultimately, what can be disclosed will be disclosed,” Fisher said.

That left Ingmar Guandique, the 31-year-old Salvadoran immigrant who is serving a 60-year sentence for felony murder in Levy's death, to sit and listen impassively through a translating headset as attorneys skated over some secret new twists in his case.

His head shaven and his hands manacled, Guandique was garbed in an orange jumpsuit instead of the jacket and sweater adopted during his November 2010 trial.

Fisher has sided with prosecutors in determining that safety considerations required closing the latest proceedings involving questions about a prosecution witness. The judge's hand in controlling information was strengthened considerably on Thursday when the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a defense plea to reverse Fisher's earlier secrecy decisions.

Patrick Carome, an attorney for several news companies that have objected to the closed-door hearings, said he was very disappointed in the two courts' rulings to impose what he called blanket secrecy.

On Wednesday, before Guandique arrived in Washington, Fisher rejected requests to make public the transcripts from hearings on Dec. 18 and Jan. 4. Following up Thursday, Fisher revealed that he's given prosecutors until early April to spell out steps that might be taken to provide the public with some redacted details.

Guandique was summoned from prison for the hearing.

A jury concluded in 2010 that he had killed the 24-year-old Levy in Washington's Rock Creek Park on May 1, 2001, shortly before she was to return to her family's home in Modesto, Calif.

 

 
 


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