Share This Page

3 dead in courthouse shooting in Delaware

| Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 9:24 p.m.

WILMINGTON, Del. — A gunman who spent years in court battles over child custody disputes opened fire on Monday in the lobby of a Delaware courthouse, leaving two women dead before police fatally shot him, authorities said.

“It happened so fast,” said Jose Beltran, 53, an employee at the New Castle County Courthouse who was entering the lobby when he heard two shots. He said he turned around and heard three or more shots as he ran.

Delaware State Police Sgt. Paul Shavack said the suspected gunman and two women are dead. Wilmington Mayor Dennis Williams said that one of the women killed was the shooter's estranged wife, but Shavack said police had not confirmed that was the case and cautioned against information from other sources.

Shavack did not say how the gunman died. He said two police officers suffered non-life-threatening injuries.

Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden said at an afternoon news conference that the shooting was not a random act of violence but the result of a custody dispute.

“It's developed out of a long — over the course of many years — custody dispute in the courts of this state,” he said.

Earlier, Shavack said the gunman opened fire before he passed metal detectors in the lobby.

Chick Chinski, 62, of Middletown said he was entering the courthouse to report for jury duty when he heard popping sounds.

“It didn't sound like gunfire first at all,” said Chinski, adding that he saw the gunman pointing his weapon.

He said it seemed that the shooter deliberately targeted the two women who were shot as they stood in the middle of the lobby.

“It's right what he went after when he come in the door,” he said.

Chinski said that before the shooting, he shared an elevator with the gunman and others from the parking garage. The gunman was quiet and did not appear agitated, Chinski said.

In the hours after the shooting, dozens of police cars and emergency vehicles were on the streets surrounding the courthouse. Police searched the courthouse room by room as a precaution.

Robert Vess, 68, dropped off his wife, Dorothy, 69, for jury duty at the courthouse Monday morning. He said it wasn't until after 10:30 a.m. that she was able to call him and let him know she was safe. Vess said his wife was crying when she called, but he thought she would be all right.

“She had said, ‘If I had my way, I'd do jury duty every day,' but I don't think so after this,” Vess said.

Diana Dorn of Wilmington, who lives behind the courthouse, said she heard the shooting from her bedroom window.

“You could hear it really clear. It was like pow, pow, pow, pow,” she said. “That's normal in my neighborhood with the drug dealers and everything.”

She said there was a heavy police response within minutes.

“This is like way out of the norm for him to go in there and start shooting,” Dorn said. “And the police station is right there. What was he thinking?”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.