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Roads like 'obstacle course' in Northeast

| Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 9:30 p.m.

The workweek opened with a white-knuckle ride on Monday in the snow-clobbered Northeast as drivers encountered unplowed streets, two-lane roads reduced to a single channel and snowbanks so high it was impossible see around corners.

Schools remained closed across much of New England and New York, and more than 100,000 homes and businesses were still without electricity from the epic storm that swept through on Friday and Saturday with 1 to 3 feet of snow.

The storm was blamed for at least 18 deaths in the United States and Canada, and officials warned of a new danger as rain and higher temperatures set in: roof collapses.

Most major highways were cleared by Monday, but the volume of snow was just too much to handle on many secondary roads. A mix of sleet and rain provided new headaches. A 10-mile stretch of Interstate 91 just north of Hartford to Massachusetts was closed briefly because of ice and accidents.

In New York, where hundreds of cars became stuck on the Long Island Expressway on Friday night and early Saturday morning, some motorists vented their anger at Gov. Andrew Cuomo for not acting more quickly to shut down major roads, as other governors did, and for not plowing more aggressively.

“You've got cars stuck all over like it's an obstacle course,” said George Kiriakos, an investment consultant from Bohemia, N.Y.

Flights resumed at major airports in the region. Boston's transit system resumed full service Monday.

The Metro-North Railroad was mostly up and running in suburban New York City, while the Long Island Rail Road said riders could expect a nearly normal schedule.

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