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Mississippi twister carves long path

AP
Family friend Susan Hrostowski comforts brothers Michael and Colin Pierce at what is left of their parents home in Hattiesburg, Miss., Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, after a tornado damaged the house Sunday afternoon. (AP Photo/Chuck Cook)

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Feb. 11, 2013, 9:36 p.m.
 

HATTIESBURG, Miss. — Jeff Revette ran from his car and lay face-down in the grass next to the red-brick wall of a church as a tornado roared toward him, with debris scattering and electrical transformers exploding. Twenty seconds later, bricks were strewn across a flattened pickup truck a mere 10 feet away amid toppled trees and power lines.

Revette, a 43-year-old National Guard soldier who returned from a deployment to Afghanistan about a year ago, stood up unharmed. A woman who had been driving the smashed pickup and had taken cover near him was pinned by some insulation and other debris, but she was OK after Revette lifted the wreckage off her.

“It's just amazing,” he said. “God is real. I am one blessed man.”

The powerful twister tore a path across at least three counties, injuring more than 60 people — but residents marveled that no one died. Officials said several circumstances converged to ensure no lives were lost in what should have been a deadly storm: Sirens and TV broadcasts gave people as much as 30 minutes of warning; the University of Southern Mississippi was emptier than usual because of Mardi Gras; and most businesses were either closed or quiet because it was a Sunday.

The sheer scope of the damage made it difficult to do a full assessment. About 50 roads were closed at one point because of felled trees, downed power lines and debris. About 200 homes and mobile homes were damaged or destroyed, with 100 apartments left uninhabitable.

Gov. Phil Bryant said the twister carved a path of destruction roughly 75 miles long, though National Weather Service officials have not yet determined the tornado's exact path or how long it was on the ground.

Early indications show it was an EF3 tornado with wind speeds reaching 145 mph in parts of Hattiesburg, weather service meteorologist Chad Entremont said.

 

 
 


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