TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Hummingbirds migrating earlier

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013, 9:12 p.m.
 

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Ruby-throated hummingbirds are migrating to North America weeks earlier than in decades past, and research indicates that higher temperatures in their winter habitat may be the reason.

Researchers say the early arrival could mean less food at nesting time for the tiny birds that feed on insect pests, help pollinate flowers and are popular with birdwatchers.

“Hummingbirds are charismatic, and they do things that fascinate us,” said Ron Johnson, a scientist at Clemson University and one of the study's authors. “They fly backward, and they hover, and they will come to feeders at homes so people can easily see them.”

Johnson and colleagues last month published an article on the migration of the hummingbirds in The Auk, the Journal of the American Ornithologists Union.

The birds, which weigh little more than a nickel, fly hundreds of miles over the Gulf of Mexico from their wintering grounds in Central America to arrive in North America. The research compared data on their first arrival times from 1890 to 1969 with arrival times during the past 15 years or so.

The comparison found that the birds are arriving in North America 12 to 18 days earlier than in the past.

The historical data on hummingbirds is based on government surveys from 3,000 naturalists who recorded the first spring arrival time of bird species over the decades.

About 6 million such records exist and are being scanned into computer databases by the North American Bird Phenology Program.

The research compared the historical documents with about 30,000 recent records on hummingbird arrivals. Scientists say the earlier arrival times could be problematic for hummingbirds, of which there are an estimated 7 million.

“With any bird that migrates over long distances, it's good to show up at the nesting grounds at a good time when you can set up a territory and build your nest and when the young come along there will be a lot of food available,” Johnson said.

“You want to be there ideally right when the food becomes available at its peak so the young ones will have enough food.”

Ecological systems work differently, Johnson said, and the hummingbirds' early arrival doesn't necessarily mean that the flowers and insects of their diet are available earlier.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Botched probe of suspected arms dealer echoed Fast and Furious, watchdog finds
  2. Ferguson grand jury cleared in leaks about police shooting of black teenager
  3. Unaccompanied immigrants put heavy strain on schools, charities
  4. Nurse defies Maine quarantine in standoff over Ebola
  5. Plane slams into pilot training center at Kansas airport, killing 4
  6. Inmate freed in landmark case
  7. Hawaii’s National Guard sent to lava flow site
  8. Terminally ill woman may delay planned Nov. 1 suicide
  9. Museum saves part of bomber plant
  10. Wash. shooting survivor has jaw surgery
  11. Gray wolf sighting reported at Grand Canyon
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.