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New England whacked by storm again

| Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013, 9:30 p.m.
Raeyonna Morgan catches snowflakes on her tongue as snow falls in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, Saturday, February 16, 2013. (Ethan Hyman/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT)

BOSTON — A little more than a week after a huge snowstorm hit New England, another storm brought several inches of snow and strong wind to parts of the Northeast on Sunday, the National Weather Service said.

Coastal parts of southern New England were expected to receive the brunt of the storm, including Cape Cod and Nantucket. About 5 inches fell in Barnstable, Mass., and up to 10 inches was forecast before the storm tapered off later Sunday. Boston was likely to escape the worst of it, said Bill Simpson, a meteorologist for the weather service in Taunton.

Much of northern Maine received more than 6 inches of snow by Sunday, and a blizzard warning was in effect until Monday afternoon for eastern and northern sections of the state, with 6 to 10 inches of snow expected in some areas.

The strong winds, not heavy snow, caused the blizzard conditions, said meteorologist Ken Wallingford in the weather service's Caribou, Maine, office. Sustained wind of 20-30 mph with gusts up to 50 mph blew the light, fluffy snow that was already on the ground, creating low visibility, possible whiteout conditions and dangerous driving conditions.

The storm wasn't expected to be on the scale of last week's, which dumped 2 to 3 feet of snow and knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses.

The storm in the Northeast is the same one that brought snow to North Carolina and South Carolina on Saturday, AccuWeather.com said.

In New York, a high-wind warning was issued for the Tappan Zee Bridge in the Hudson Valley, reducing the speed limit to 35 mph and prohibiting empty trailers and motorcycles on the bridge. All trucks, trailers, and buses were advised to consider an alternate route. But snow was not expected in upstate New York or the Berkshires, according to the weather service.

Authorities blamed icy roads and drunken driving for one fatal wreck in Charlotte, but for the most part, Saturday's snow caused few power outages and disruptions.

The snow made it to areas that missed the first two storms in North Carolina this winter. Nearly four inches of snow fell in Charlotte in that city's first measurable snow since 2011. Wilmington also reported snow for the first time in two years.

Much farther south, in parts of Florida's key citrus-growing region, a cold front threatened to push temperatures as low as 27 degrees by Monday morning. However, the low temperatures in central and northern Florida were unlikely to drop down enough to cause significant damage to the state's $9 billion citrus industry, according to the National Weather Service.

“We're not looking at copious amounts of snow,” he said. “The big news is going to be the wind.”

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