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Ballistic missile detection system successful in major test

| Monday, Feb. 18, 2013, 7:36 p.m.

WASHINGTON — A Raytheon system built into big blimp-like balloons has demonstrated capabilities that could make it easier to detect and track certain enemy ballistic missiles, the company and the Army's manager of the program said.

System tests in December at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico successfully tracked four targets mimicking tactical ballistic missiles in “high-threat” regions, Raytheon will announce on Tuesday.

The hardware is known as Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, or Jlens. It includes a targeting radar and a wide-area surveillance radar with a 360-degree look-around capability that can reach out to 340 miles.

Each radar system flies as high as 10,000 feet with a separate, 74-meter-long aerostat capable of operating aloft for up to 30 days while tethered to mobile moorings.

The bulbous, blimp-like aerostats work in pairs officially estimated to cost about $450 million — though Raytheon has said it can cut that price by one-third.

The Dec. 6-7 tests met all primary and secondary goals, including “launch point estimation, ballistic tracking and discrimination performance,” Raytheon, the world's biggest missile-maker, said in a draft press release.

The missiles were tracked during their so-called boost phase, it said, including two that were “ripple-fired” one after the other.

Jlens' “proven capabilities” provide another tool that could help protect U.S. and partner forces from “the growing ballistic missile threat” and other threats, Dean Barten, who manages the program for the Army, said in the release. Barten's statement was confirmed by an Army spokesman.

The Army is preparing one of its two Jlens systems, formally known as an orbit, for a three-year exercise that will tie it into a high-tech shield designed to protect the Washington area from air attack.

The second Jlens system could be sent overseas sooner.

The system is designed to provide more time to detect and react to cruise missiles, manned and unmanned aircraft and other threats, compared with ground-based radar.

It has been demonstrated to be capable of picking out moving vehicles that could be used for attacks, including boats, cars and trucks, according to the Army and Raytheon.

“We think Jlens is ready for action wherever it may be needed,” said Mark Rose, Raytheon's Jlens program director.

The program has been scaled back sharply by the government amid Pentagon belt-tightening to help pare trillion-dollar-a-year deficits.

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