TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Labor policy on illegals closer

Daily Photo Galleries

By McClatchy Newspapers
Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, 7:48 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Two of the nation's most powerful interest groups — labor and business, often at loggerheads — have come to a rare agreement on the guiding principles for handling low-skilled immigrant workers.

Although a deal is far from finalized, the agreement is a significant step toward surmounting a major roadblock on immigration — temporary workers.

The agreement between the Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO establishes a set of principles for low-skilled worker visas. The guidelines include creating a visa program that would allow some temporary workers the opportunity to become permanent residents; establishing a federal bureau that would oversee the program; and giving American workers more information — a “first crack” — on available jobs.

Chamber of Commerce President and Chief Executive Officer Thomas J. Donohue and AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka described immigration as an urgent national priority.

“The fact that business and labor can come together to negotiate in good faith over contentious issues should be a signal to Congress and the American people that support for immigration reform is widespread and growing, and is important to our economy and our society,” they said in a joint statement Thursday announcing the agreement.

Bipartisan lawmakers working on the immigration overhaul view buy-in from the sides as key to reaching a compromise between pro-labor Democrats and pro-business Republicans in Congress, but their differences have long been some of the most difficult to resolve.

To many Republicans, the temporary worker program is crucial to providing businesses needed labor, while limiting future waves of illegal immigration.

Labor unions, and some Democrats who support them, have opposed expanding the programs, insisting on a path to citizenship. They say the programs breed abusive practices and are unfair competition for American laborers.

“While the devil will be in the details in terms of fleshing these principles out, our staffs have had very productive discussions with both sides this week,” Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration, said in a statement. Schumer is one of the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” senators who are working on developing an agreement for an immigration overhaul.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Study: At least 786 child abuse victims died despite being on protective services’ radar
  2. Castle doctrine doesn’t hold up in Montana murder case
  3. U.S., Cuba patching torn relations with historic accord
  4. Lifting limits on Cuba a boon for U.S.
  5. Republican lawmakers vow to block confirmation of any potential ambassador to Cuba
  6. Sale of ‘Breathe Easy’ shirts blasted amid Indiana protests
  7. Fracking essentially banned in N.Y.
  8. Sony bows to threats, cancels Dec. 25 release of ‘The Interview’
  9. 14 tied to Mass. pharmacy charged in meningitis outbreak that claimed 64
  10. Conn. dentist’s license suspended over death
  11. Supreme Court says Arizona cannot withhold licenses from young immigrants who entered illegally
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.