TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Biden leads re-enactment of 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery voting rights march

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Sunday, March 3, 2013, 9:39 p.m.
 

SELMA, Ala. — The vice president and black leaders commemorating a famous civil rights march on Sunday said efforts to diminish the impact of blacks' votes haven't stopped in the years since the 1965 Voting Rights Act added millions to Southern voter rolls.

More than 5,000 people followed Vice President Joe Biden and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma's annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee. The event commemorates the “Bloody Sunday” beating of voting rights marchers — including a young Lewis — by state troopers as they began a march to Montgomery in March 1965. The 50-mile march prompted Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act, which struck down impediments to voting by blacks and ended all-white rule in the South.

Biden, the first sitting vice president to participate in the annual re-enactment, said nothing shaped his consciousness more than watching TV footage of the beatings.

“We saw in stark relief the rank hatred, discrimination and violence that still existed in large parts of the nation,” he said.

Biden said marchers “broke the back of the forces of evil,” but that challenges to voting rights continue today with restrictions on early voting and voter registration drives and enactment of voter ID laws where no voter fraud has been shown.

“We will never give up or give in,” Lewis told marchers.

Martin Luther King III, whose father led the march when it resumed after Bloody Sunday, said, “We come here not to just celebrate and observe but to recommit.”

Jesse Jackson said the event had a sense of urgency because the Supreme Court heard a request on Wednesday by a mostly white Alabama county to strike down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act.

“We've had the right to vote 48 years, but they've never stopping trying to diminish the impact of the votes,” Jackson said.

Referring to the Voting Rights act, the Rev. Al Sharpton said: “We are not here for a commemoration. We are here for a continuation.”

The Supreme Court is weighing Shelby County's challenge to a portion of the law that requires states with a history of racial discrimination, mostly in the Deep South, to get approval from the Justice Department before implementing any changes in election laws. That includes everything from new voting districts to voter ID laws.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Mountaineer workers fear smoking ban will harm ‘livelihood’
  2. Man convicted of enslaving woman gets 30 years
  3. Cyber domain is next battleground, authors of 9/11 report warn
  4. To fight crime, Chicago tries wiping away arrests
  5. U.S. intel believes civilian plane might have been mistaken for Ukraine military aircraft
  6. For more than 8 decades, N.Y. farmer has kept eye to the sky
  7. HGH use on the rise in teens, survey finds
  8. Explosion levels home in Central Texas; 3 hurt
  9. VA nominee to demand ‘urgent action,’ he tells panel
  10. Autistic twin men locked up in Maryland home
  11. Defiant Vietnam POW honored
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.