| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Human trafficking attacked

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By USA Today
Sunday, March 3, 2013, 9:36 p.m.

A wave of efforts to stop human trafficking has spread across the country as lawmakers and others look to combat the problem through law, policy and grass-roots activism.

Although approaches vary, advocates say more must be done to stop the crime, dubbed “modern-day slavery” and defined by the State Department as the recruitment, transportation or harboring of people by means of deception or coercion. Victims, often mentally and physically abused, are being forced into prostitution, unfair working conditions or other exploitative situations.

“Consciousness and outrage have reached a different level because of the perverseness but also the impact of human trafficking,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. “People understand that everyone has a responsibility to fight human trafficking and every individual can have an impact.”

Cases of traffickers recruiting students at U.S. schools, selling sex online and in hotels and operating slave enterprises alongside everyday life have led to increased awareness.

Two lawmakers in Maryland last month announced plans to toughen state laws on trafficking, joining a long list of people around the country working to make the crime in the United States a central topic of 2013.

Blumenthal and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, began the U.S. Senate Caucus to End Human Trafficking in November and sponsored a bill that later became law to prevent federal contracts from going to companies that benefit from forms of trafficking.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Propane, oil prices expected to be lower over winter
  2. Ex-coal CEO Blankenship talks safety in secretly recorded calls
  3. Dell buying EMC in a transaction valued at about $67 billion
  4. Stocks up before earnings reports
  5. El Niño storms might not be savior for Calif.
  6. Half Moon Bay contest dubs 1,969-pound pumpkin the plumpest
  7. Supreme Court to consider reprieve for teens who kill
  8. Part of major highway reopens as South Carolina recovers from floods
  9. Lawmaker seeks ban on LGBT ‘conversion therapy’ in New Hampshire
  10. Community lines streets as students return to class in Roseburg
  11. Sagging inflation expected to rule out Social Security cost-of-living adjustment