TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Harvard secretly sifted through deans' emails, newspapers claim

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 5:30 p.m.
 

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Harvard University administrators secretly searched the emails of 16 deans last fall, looking for a leak to reporters about a case of cheating, two newspapers reported.

The email accounts belonged to deans on the Administrative Board, a committee addressing the cheating, The Boston Globe and The New York Times reported, citing school officials. The deans were not warned about the email access and only one was told of the search afterward.

Harvard will not comment on personnel matters or provide additional information about the board cases that were concluded during the fall term, Michael Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, said in an email on Sunday. If the committee's work were compromised, Harvard College would protect the process, he said.

“Generally speaking, however, if circumstances were to arise that gave reason to believe that the Administrative Board process might have been compromised, then Harvard College would take all necessary and appropriate actions under our procedures to safeguard the integrity of that process, which is designed to protect the rights of our students to privacy and due process,” he said.

Smith's office and the Harvard general counsel's office authorized the search, the Globe reported.

Harvard spokesman Jeff Neal did not specifically address the allegations but denied any routine monitoring of emails.

“Any assertion that Harvard routinely monitors emails — for any reason — is patently false,” he said in an email.

Sharon Howell, Harvard's senior resident dean, criticized Harvard administrators and said they owed the deans an apology for failing to notify the email accountholders until after gaining access to the emails.

“They don't seem to think they've done anything wrong,” she told the Globe.

Harvard University said last month that it issued academic sanctions against about 60 students who were forced to withdraw from school for a period of time in a cheating scandal that involved the final exam in a class on Congress. The school implicated as many as 125 students in the scandal when officials first addressed the issue last year.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Georgia judge says she did not involuntarily commit Louisiana movie theater gunman Houser
  2. House, Senate clash over highway funds before Friday deadline
  3. National Security Agency to stop looking at old telephone records
  4. Republicans seek firing of IRS chief in feud over missing emails
  5. Nuke arms program gets 4-star leadership
  6. Outside attorneys to help investigate Bland death in Texas jail
  7. Police try to see if man killed by escort was linked to crimes against women
  8. Huckabee ‘door of the oven’ comment brings backlash
  9. Fiat Chrysler to buy back more than 500K Ram pickups
  10. Cruz chided over remarks in prelude to Ex-Im Bank vote
  11. Troops displayed ‘valor’ in response to Chattanooga gunman, authorities say