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CDC survey: 1 in 50 U.S. schoolkids have autism

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By The Associated Press
Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 9:30 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — A government survey of parents says 1 in 50 schoolchildren has autism, surpassing another federal estimate for the disorder.

Health officials say the new number doesn't mean autism is occurring more often. But it suggests that doctors are diagnosing autism more frequently, especially in children with milder problems.

The earlier government estimate of 1-in- 88was derived from a study that many consider more rigorous. It looks at medical and school records instead of relying on parents.

For decades, autism meant kids with severe language, intellectual and social impairments, and unusual, repetitious behaviors. But the definition has gradually expanded and now includes milder, related conditions.

The new estimate released on Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would mean at least 1 million children have autism.

The number is important — government officials look at how common each illness or disorder is when weighing how to spend limited public health funds.

It's also controversial.

The new statistic comes from a national phone survey of more than 95,000 parents in 2011 and 2012. Less than a quarter of the parents contacted agreed to answer questions, and it's likely that those with autistic kids were more interested than other parents in participating in a survey on children's health, CDC officials said.

Still, CDC officials believe the survey provides a valid snapshot of how many families are affected by autism, said Stephen Blumberg, the CDC report's lead author.

The study that came up with the 1-in-88 estimate had its own limitations. It focused on 14 states, only on children 8 years old, and the data came from 2008.

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