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Nev. lawmaker sets record: expulsion

| Thursday, March 28, 2013, 7:15 p.m.
Nevada Assembly Majority Leader William Horne comforts Assemblywoman Dina Neal after an emotional vote to expel fellow Assemblyman Steven Brooks on Thursday, March 28.

CARSON CITY, Nev. — A Nevada assemblyman whose erratic behavior dominated headlines for weeks will go down in history as the first lawmaker expelled from the state Legislature by his peers.

In a somber, emotional hearing, the Nevada Assembly voted Thursday to oust Democrat Steven Brooks. Several members were heard crying.

Fellow Democrat and Assembly Majority Leader William Horne said people no longer felt safe with him in the legislative building.

“How dare they?” Brooks said in a brief telephone interview immediately after the voice vote. “I've been convicted of nothing.”

Brooks alleged that unspecified opponents have tried to kill him. He didn't take questions.

“Yes, tried to kill me,” he said. “I'm an open book. They won't let me testify at the Grant Sawyer Building, and they sent 100 police officers to arrest me.”

“Let me ask you, how can they do that?” Brooks added before hanging up.

Brooks lawyer, Mitchell Posin, said he is “disappointed” and surprised, “especially because I was recently told it wasn't going to be heard today.”

Posin said he would discuss with Brooks their next step.

Brooks was arrested twice since January and is accused of making threats toward his colleagues, including Assembly Speaker Marilyn Kirkpatrick.

Last month, Brooks was denied the purchase of a gun after he was banished from the chambers. His lawyer said Thursday there's been a misunderstanding and that Brooks doesn't pose any threat to anyone.

Brooks, 41, won re-election in the Nov. 6 general election by a 2-to-1 margin over an unknown challenger.

He first was arrested Jan. 19 in a car with a gun and dozens of rounds of ammunition after allegedly voicing a threat against Kirkpatrick, a fellow North Las Vegas Democrat. The state attorney general's office is handling that case, and no formal charges have yet been filed.

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