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Pipeline spills forces Utah governor to act; Chevron warned

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, March 28, 2013, 9:18 p.m.
 

SALT LAKE CITY — A series of spills from ruptured pipelines operated by Chevron Corp. has Utah's governor calling for more oversight.

Gov. Gary Herbert left no doubt about his displeasure on Thursday when asked about the latest spill at a monthly televised news conference. He said the federal agency responsible for interstate pipelines isn't doing its job and that Utah will step up its own efforts to ensure pipeline safety.

The pipeline ruptured last week at Willard Bay State Park, spilling diesel fuel into marshes. It was Chevron's third pipeline leak in Utah in the last three years.

Another pipeline leak sent crude oil rushing down into a Salt Lake City creek in 2010. Months later, the same pipeline ruptured again.

Each pipeline leak involved a spill of 21,000 or more gallons of crude oil or fuel.

“If anything's been disappointing in the past couple of weeks, it's been this Chevron oil spill,” Herbert said. “This is just not acceptable. We need to take a more proactive stance.”

Herbert said his state departments of commerce and environmental quality are looking to hold Chevron more accountable.

 

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