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Obama steps up fundraising drive with stops in Denver, San Francisco

| Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 9:51 p.m.

President Obama, eager to revive his stalled gun-control agenda, will tour a Denver police academy on Wednesday to put public pressure on his political opponents. In the evening, the president will make a private appeal to a more exclusive gathering at the San Francisco mansion of billionaire Gordon Getty.

The evening festivities are part of a two-day Western swing by Obama, arranged foremost as a return of the Democrats' No. 1 fundraiser to the money trail five months after Obama won his final election.

The dinner at the Getty home, along with three other high-dollar receptions in the Bay Area, are the first of 14 events the president will headline this year to help fill the coffers of the Democratic Party well in advance of the 2014 midterm elections. In addition, he is expected to raise money this year for Organizing for Action, his former campaign apparatus that has morphed into a “social justice organization” dedicated to advancing Obama's legislative agenda.

It is a robust pace for a president sworn into office just over two months ago, but Obama and his advisers believe the investment is crucial in an era when both parties are increasingly engaged in round-the-clock campaigning.

After raising a record $1.1 billion for his re-election, the president is involved in a behind-the-scenes effort to win back the House and hold on to the Senate next year.

“He's going to be raising money to try to elect people who he believes share his agenda and his priorities,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said this week.

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