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Conn. adopts new gun control law

| Thursday, April 4, 2013, 9:30 p.m.

HARTFORD, Conn. — Gov. Dannel Malloy signed into law sweeping new restrictions on weapons and large capacity ammunition magazines on Thursday in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre, a bipartisan deal that gun control proponents hope will spark action in Washington and state legislatures across the country.

Just four months ago, the governor broke the news to shocked parents that their children had been slaughtered in the Newtown school. Four of those parents joined him as he signed the bill into law during a somber ceremony at the state Capitol, his act giving Connecticut some of the toughest gun control laws in the country.

Malloy hugged each of the parents and gave them a pen he used to sign the bill.

“We have come together in a way that relatively few places in our nation have demonstrated an ability to do,” he said.

Since the Dec. 14 shooting in which 20 children and six educators were killed, some of their family members have become accidental gun control advocates, pressing for both tougher state and federal laws.

“This is a path I never thought my life would take. But working to save the lives of others is one way that I can honor Dylan's life,” said Nicole Hockley, referring to her 6-year-old son who was killed at Sandy Hook. “We want Newtown to be known not for our tragedy but for transformation.”

Malloy said he's become friends with some of the parents and promised to keep working with them to enact further law changes that address gun violence.

“Today does not mark the end of our efforts,” Malloy said.

Malloy and gun control advocates said they hope the new law, crafted by legislative leaders from both parties during several weeks of negotiations, coupled with President Obama's planned visit to the state Monday, will spur action in Washington.

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