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Shop that sold gun to Sandy Hook shooter's mom loses federal firearms license

| Friday, April 5, 2013, 7:00 p.m.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — A shop that sold a gun to the Newtown school shooter's mother has lost its federal firearms license.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives revoked the license of Riverview Gun Sales in East Windsor in December. The agency, which confirmed the revocation to reporters on Thursday, didn't say why.

Authorities raided the store for undisclosed reasons shortly after the December school shootings in which Adam Lanza killed 20 first-graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School. He also shot to death his mother, Nancy, in their home. Authorities say he fired 154 shots with a Bushmaster .223-caliber rifle inside the school, then killed himself with a Glock handgun.

Nancy Lanza purchased a Bushmaster from Riverview, according to a person close to the investigation into the school shooting who spoke on condition of anonymity because the probe is continuing. It could not be confirmed whether the Bushmaster was the one used in the shooting.

Shop owner David LaGuercia said in December that Nancy Lanza bought a gun from him years ago, but he couldn't remember what kind. He said at the time he was cooperating with law enforcement.

“There is nothing more devastating than the loss of a child,” LaGuercia said in a statement in December. “We are absolutely appalled that the product that we sold several years ago would be used in this type of horrendous crime.”

His wife, Shelley Clemens, said Friday that she and her husband still don't know why the ATF revoked his firearms license. She said the store remains open selling ammunition and other items that aren't firearms while LaGuercia appeals the revocation.

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