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Republican-controlled Ohio House to buck Kasich, drop Medicaid expansion

| Monday, April 8, 2013, 7:45 p.m.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — A Republican-controlled legislative panel will drop Gov. John Kasich's proposal to expand the Medicaid program from the state's two-year budget plan, The Associated Press has learned, as advocates for extending the health care coverage to thousands more low-income Ohioans prepared to rally against the move.

A person with knowledge of the budget negotiations confirmed to the AP on Monday that House lawmakers will strip the idea from their version of the state spending blueprint. The person requested anonymity because the information had not yet been made public.

The House version of the Republican governor's $63.2 billion, two-year spending blueprint is expected to be introduced Tuesday afternoon by the chamber's budget-writing committee.

The House Finance and Appropriations Committee is expected to include $50 million per year for mental health and addiction services, the person said.

House lawmakers were expected to strip a tax increase on oil and gas drillers and sales taxes on professional services out of Kasich's budget and to significantly rewrite his proposed school-funding formula.

The Medicaid expansion is one of the key components of the federal Affordable Care Act. Of the nearly 30 million people expected to gain insurance coverage under the law, about half would get it from the Medicaid expansion. A Supreme Court ruling allowed states to decide for themselves whether to expand the program.

Kasich in February proposed going forward with expansion, contending that Medicaid expansion was the way for the state to recapture Ohio taxpayers' federal money to provide medical care for those who were most vulnerable.

About 366,000 Ohio residents would be eligible for health coverage under the expansion beginning in 2014.

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