TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

SEAL to testify at leak trial in private

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 8:24 p.m.
 

A military judge ruled on Wednesday that a member of the team that raided Osama bin Laden's compound would be allowed to testify at the court-martial of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, part of the prosecution's attempt to link the slain al-Qaida leader to material leaked by the soldier.

Manning, who pleaded guilty to some charges last month, is scheduled to face a court-martial in June for leaking 700,000 documents and other materials to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.

Prosecutors, who have alleged that Manning's actions damaged national security, say digital media found at bin Laden's compound in Pakistan show that the terrorist leader received access to some of the WikiLeaks material through an associate.

Manning's defense team has argued that evidence obtained from the raid was not relevant to the charges against Manning, which include aiding the enemy. But on Wednesday, Army Col. Denise Lind disagreed, ruling that the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the “enemy received” the material.

The witness, identified as “John Doe” and as a “DoD operator,” will testify in a closed session at an undisclosed location, Lind said, and will appear in “light disguise.”

It is presumed that the witness is a member of the Navy SEAL Team 6 that raided bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in May 2011. Only one member of the raid team has been publicly identified — Matt Bissonette, who was named shortly after publishing an account of the raid under a pseudonym.

The prosecution is hoping to call more than 20 witnesses in closed session, including officials from the State Department, Defense Department, FBI and CIA. In addition to the member of the bin Laden raid team, the names of four other witnesses are being withheld. The four are also expected to testify about the material discovered at bin Laden's compound.

Last month, Manning pleaded guilty to 10 charges and provided a courtroom at Fort Meade with a detailed account of his decision to divulge the trove of diplomatic cables and battlefield incident reports to WikiLeaks. The former intelligence analyst said that he was seeking to spark a debate about what he described as the nation's obsession with “killing and capturing people.”

But the prosecution is seeking to prove 22 additional charges against Manning, including aiding the enemy, which carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Planet Mars likely had ocean, lost it, researchers find
  2. WVU, Va. coal company at odds over research papers
  3. Reports: Actor Ford seriously injured in small-plane crash in L.A.
  4. Feds weighed national standards but let North Dakota set regulations for oil trains’ safety
  5. Mother of 12-year-old shot dead by police criticizes Cleveland for faulting son, failing to apologize
  6. Foreign government gifts to family charity present candidacy hurdle for Hillary Clinton
  7. Ferguson’s white officer justified in shooting black man, feds find
  8. Natural gas royalties lawsuit hinges on transaction date
  9. Young white males replace older black men as OD victims as heroin deaths climb
  10. Tribune-Review poll: Cable news rises as network news falls
  11. Attorney General Holder backs change in civil rights law