TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Military attempts to end Guantanamo Bay detainees' hunger strike

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Washington Post
Saturday, April 13, 2013, 6:57 p.m.
 

The military attempted to break a hunger strike at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, early Saturday when the detention center commander ordered an end to communal living conditions and returned the detainees, sometimes forcibly, to single cells.

“This action was taken in response to efforts by detainees to limit the guard force's ability to observe the detainees by covering surveillance cameras, windows and glass partitions,” said Navy Capt. Robert Durand, a spokesman for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. “Round-the-clock monitoring is necessary to ensure security, order and safety as detainees continued a prolonged hunger strike by refusing regular camp-provided meals.”

Durand said in a statement that some detainees “resisted with improvised weapons, and in response, four less-than-lethal rounds were fired.”

He said there were no serious injuries to guards or detainees.

The hunger strike began in early February after detainees said the guard force initiated aggressive sweeps of the cells that they alleged included inappropriate searches of the detainees' Qurans. The military acknowledged that Qurans were searched for contraband, but said they were handled only by interpreters, most of whom are Muslim, not the guard force.

Lawyers for the detainees, the military and the International Committee for the Red Cross agree that the hunger strike is also born of a deeper frustration that the Obama administration has abandoned any real effort to close the facility.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Ohio dairy farmers cashing in on gas well boom
  2. Letter that inspired Beat poet Kerouac discovered
  3. Police code of conduct aims to curb unlawful seizures from motorists
  4. Under pressure, Hagel steps down as Pentagon chief
  5. Boy with fake gun shot by officer dies
  6. Tufts center study: It costs $2.6B to get drug to market
  7. Report: College judicial boards work secretively
  8. Nevada speaker-elect steps down amid criticism
  9. 3-mile buffer suggested for grouse breeding, oil and gas drilling
  10. U.S. to arm Iraq’s Sunni tribesmen
  11. Tension, anxiety mount in Ferguson as grand jury ruling awaited
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.