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NASA facility seeks boost from launch

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, April 13, 2013, 7:39 p.m.
 

WALLOPS ISLAND, Va. — On one of Virginia's small barrier islands, a NASA facility that operates in relative obscurity outside scientific circles, is preparing to be thrust into the spotlight.

On Wednesday, Orbital Sciences Corp. plans to conduct the first test launch of its Antares rocket under a NASA program in which private companies deliver supplies to the International Space Station. If all goes as planned, the unmanned rocket's practice payload will be vaulted into orbit from Wallops Island before burning up in the atmosphere on its return to Earth several months later.

The goal of the launch is not to connect with the space station, but to make sure the rocket works and that a simulated version of a cargo ship that will dock with the station on future launches separates into orbit. Orbital officials say that should occur about 10 minutes after liftoff.

In that short period of time, Wallops Island will transition from a little-known launch pad for small research rockets to a major player in the U.S. space program.

The Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's rural Eastern Shore is small in comparison to major NASA centers like those in Florida, California and Texas. The site is near Maryland and just south of Chincoteague Island, which attracts thousands of tourists each summer for an annual wild pony swim made famous by the 1947 novel “Misty of Chincoteague.”

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