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Boston probe expands to Russia; report says CIA wanted older brother on watch list

| Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 8:03 p.m.

BOSTON — From Boston and Washington to Russia, investigators pressed for answers on Wednesday about the Muslim radicalism believed behind the Boston Marathon bombings, while more than 4,000 mourners paid tribute to an MIT police officer who authorities say was gunned down by the bombers.

Among the speakers at the service in Cambridge was Vice President Joe Biden, who condemned the bombing suspects as “two twisted, perverted, cowardly, knockoff jihadis.”

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was listed in fair condition as he recovered from wounds suffered during a violent getaway attempt. He is seen in video with his older brother, now dead, placing bombs that killed three people and wounded more than 260 on April 15.

The bombs were detonated by remote control, U.S. officials close to the investigation told the Associated Press. It was not clear what the detonation device was, but the charges against Dzhokhar say he was using a cellphone moments before the blasts.

The CIA asked the main U.S. counterterrorism agency to add the name of Tamerlan Tsarnaev to a watch list more than a year before the attack, U.S. officials told The Washington Post.

Russian authorities had contacted officials there in the fall of 2011 and raised concerns that Tsarnaev was an increasingly radical Islamist and could be planning to travel overseas. The CIA requested that his name be put on a database maintained by the National Counterterrorism Center.

In Russia, U.S. investigators traveled to the predominantly Muslim province of Dagestan and were in contact with the brothers' parents, hoping to gain more information.

The parents, Anzor Tsarnaev and Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, plan to fly to the United States on Thursday, the father told a Russian state news agency.

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