TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

'Amazing discovery' of mouse hormone could aid diabetics

Daily Photo Galleries

By USA Today
Thursday, April 25, 2013, 8:45 p.m.
 

A newly discovered mouse hormone may open the door to better treatment for diabetes, researchers suggested on Thursday.

The hormone, called betatrophin, triggers the growth of pancreatic “beta” cells lost or ineffective in diabetes. Insulin is produced by beta cells in the pancreas.

Diabetes afflicts more than 25 million people nationwide, according to the American Diabetes Association. It is a condition that causes high blood sugar that can lead to heart disease, kidney failure and blindness.

In the journal Cell, a team led by Harvard's Peng Yi reports that betatrophin can produce a roughly seventeenfold increase in these cells, and its increase may partly explain the rapid growth of these cells seen during pregnancy to feed developing fetuses in mammals, including people.

“This is really an amazing discovery. Hormones with this kind of effect aren't discovered very often, and this opens a whole new pathway to treating diabetes,” said diabetes expert Jake Kushner of the McNair Medical Institute at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who was not part of the study team. He cautioned that the hormone's effects, which the study team sees as isolated to beta cells, need to be thoroughly investigated in animal studies for safety.

The hormone was discovered almost by accident, as the Harvard team investigated a research compound that basically recreates what happens in diabetes. The compound short circuits the release of insulin in response to increasing blood sugar. When that happened to the mice in the study, their production of the hormone betatrophin ramped up and spurred the growth of insulin producing cells. Diabetics often need daily insulin injections to compensate for the condition, where in Type 2, or adult-onset diabetes, the most frequent kind, beta cells stop producing enough insulin, and in juvenile diabetes, or Type 1, about 10 percent of cases, beta cells have died.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Dallas hospital officials confirm 1st Ebola case diagnosed in U.S.
  2. California becomes 1st state to ban plastic bags
  3. FCC backs end to NFL broadcast blackouts
  4. Some La. hospitals bill rape victims; legislators vow to end policy
  5. Road closed by mudslide reopens after six months
  6. Supreme Court blocks start of early Ohio voting
  7. Dogfish remain abundant off Maine, East Coast
  8. FAA reviews contingency plans, security policies after Chicago air traffic control center fire
  9. NSA relies on 1981 executive order signed by Reagan
  10. Sprawling wind farm eyed in Wyoming
  11. Obama says U.S. wrong about Islamic State threat
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.