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Justice Breyer falls from bike, requires surgery

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Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer was appointed by President Clinton in 1994.

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By McClatchy Newspapers
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 7:51 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer broke his shoulder in a fall from his bicycle and underwent surgery on Saturday morning, according to a court spokeswoman.

The 74-year-old justice was resting comfortably and is expected to be released from Georgetown University Hospital early in the week.

Breyer was riding his bike on Friday afternoon near the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, next to the Lincoln Memorial, when he fell, according to the statement. He was taken to the hospital by ambulance.

The justice has had his share of out-of-the-courtroom troubles of late. Last year, he and his wife were robbed at knife-point in their winter vacation home on a Caribbean island. Shortly afterward, their Georgetown home was burglarized.

Breyer had a previous and painful bike accident. It happened in 1993 when he was being considered for the Supreme Court by President Clinton. He traveled from Boston to Washington to speak with the president despite his arm's being in a sling.

That nomination went to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, but Breyer was selected for the court in the next year.

 

 
 


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