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Yelp adds jail reviews to consumer help lineup

| Saturday, April 27, 2013, 10:15 p.m.

Lawyer Robert Miller has visited five prisons and 17 jails in his lifetime, but he has reviewed only three of them on Yelp. One he found “average,” with inexperienced and power-hungry officers. Another he faulted for its “kind of very firmly rude staff.” His most recent review, a January critique of Theo Lacy jail in Orange County, Calif., lauds the cleanliness, urban setting and “very nice” deputies.

Miller gave it five out of five stars.

“I started reviewing because I needed something to kill time while I waited to see clients,” said Miller, who has worked as a private defense lawyer in Southern California for 18 years. “But I think the reviews are actually helpful for bail bondsmen, attorneys, family members — a lot of people, actually.”

As Miller acknowledges, it's not the kind of helpful testimonial commonly found on Yelp, the popular consumer reviews site many people turn to for recommendations on, say, bowling alleys and Chinese takeout.

As Yelp grows more popular — logging 36 million reviews as of last quarter — lawyers as well as inmates and their family members have turned to the site to report mediocre food and allegations of serious abuse. They join the enterprising reviewers who have used Yelp to critique traffic signals and public bathrooms.

Because Yelp does not break out statistics by business type, it's difficult to tell how many jails and prisons have been reviewed in the 19 countries covered by the site.

“At no time did the officer violate any of my constitutional privileges and even gave me a juice box after I said I was thirsty,” reads one review, this one of the Arlington County (Va.) Detention Facility. “Yes, you heard right, they have juice boxes! ... So if you're going to get arrested, do it in Arlington County.”

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