| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

GOP keeps pressure on White House over Benghazi attack

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 9:27 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Congressional Republicans are continuing to pepper the Obama administration with questions about last year's deadly attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya.

Although an independent review board has blamed inadequate security at the compound on senior management and leadership failures at the State Department, some GOP lawmakers have suggested that the administration is trying to cover up more serious deficiencies or negligence before, during and after the attack.

On Tuesday, the issue surfaced at a White House news conference when President Obama was asked about allegations that his administration is preventing whistle-blowers from testifying before Congress about the incident. Obama pleaded ignorance, but Secretary of State John Kerry and his staff denied any impropriety and vowed that all questions would be answered.

A clearly exasperated Kerry complained during a separate news conference about “an enormous amount of misinformation out there” about the Benghazi attack that killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans on the 11th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001.

“We have to demythologize this issue and certainly depoliticize it,” Kerry told reporters at the State Department.

Kerry promised to deal with any unresolved issues and directed his chief of staff, David Wade, to work with lawmakers to that end.

On Tuesday, though, four Republican lawmakers renewed demands for more information.

Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., called again for the formation of a joint select committee to investigate the handling of the attack. They said the committee was needed in light of new revelations about Benghazi, including reports that some whistle-blowers are “afraid to testify.”

Rep. Darrell Issa , R-Calif., complained that he had not received responses to four letters he sent to the administration calling for whistle-blowers' lawyers to get the security clearances needed to represent their clients.

Issa would not identify the whistleblowers.

At the State Department, spokesman Patrick Ventrell flatly denied that any employee had been threatened or told to remain silent.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read Nation

  1. Prof proposes museum of corruption in New York capital
  2. Pot doctors in medical marijuana states push boundaries with marketing
  3. AIDS activist finishes rowing across Atlantic
  4. Disability claim waits grow alongside swelling caseloads for judges
  5. Suspect in Colorado attack called loner who left few clues
  6. Federal $1.1 trillion spending bill loaded with policy deals
  7. Artists plan to rebuild Alaska art display damaged by tides
  8. Kids making oral history with StoryCorps holiday project
  9. Nuclear crossroad: California reactors face uncertain future
  10. Hawaii confronts dengue fever cases
  11. Ex-Benghazi panel staffer Podliska files suit against chairman Gowdy