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Poll: Few Americans interested in immigration debate

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By The Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 7:24 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — For all the attention given so far to efforts in Congress to overhaul the nation's immigration laws, nearly four in 10 Americans say they don't know enough about it to have an opinion, and fewer than one-quarter could correctly answer a couple of basic questions about it, a new poll shows.

The survey, by the Pew Research Center, underscores an important fact in the immigration debate — most of the public has not yet tuned in. A bipartisan proposal negotiated by eight senators has gathered considerable strength, and Senate debate is scheduled to start next week, but because so many Americans remain unengaged, predictions about the bill's fate almost certainly remain premature.

Just more than half of those surveyed said either that they did not think the immigration bill would have much impact one way or the other on the economy or that they didn't know what impact it would have.

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